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Things I have been thinking about lately:

(1)  How old is George Cowley? In "Old Dog with New Tricks" Doyle says that Cowley got the bullet in his leg in Spain. Since Spain was technically neutral (fascist government or not) in World War II, unless he came a cropper in Occupied Europe and was shot while the Comet Line and heroes of the Resistance like Dedee de Jongh got him into Spain and on to British Gibraltar, it suggests that he was in an International Brigade during the Spanish Civil War (1936-39). Only around 2,500 men and women from the UK went over, as the British government did not that any other country should send aid to Spain; and most of those who signed up were Communists, which clearly Cowley is, and was, not; though others were socialists or liberals or just anti-fascists. The International Brigades were disbanded in autumn 1938.

On this evidence, and given that he had not already gone to University (according to Charlie in "Look After Annie") Cowley was probably born between 1918 and 1920. He could be a little older if he had started university but not graduated, but I find it doubtful that he could have been much younger, under the circumstances. Any thoughts?

(2)  Wikipedia and my own previous Bodie profile, calculated Bodie's d.o.b to 1950 - which I liked (among other reasons) because it is the Year of the (Metal) Tiger.

However, talking to people of my parents' generation (which is also MS and LC's generation), "I was at school. Third form... Junior school." ("A Stirring of Dust") would not mean the equivalent to modern Year Three with "Junior" and "Primary" school being pretty much interchangeable, as they often were when I was growing up (and are?), but specifically meant third year *juniors* with the two or three years of "Infant School" being counted separately. So Bodie was, according to canon, nine or ten years old "twenty years" before 1978 (and the gravestone of Eileen Pierce confirms the year). While twenty years may be rounding up or down, obviously, I can't help thinking Cowley is too much of a man for details not to mention the exact period at some point. So this means 1948 or 1949 as Bodie's year of birth. Earth Ox or Earth Rat in "Chinese Astrology". (Incidentally, May 1946 made LC a Fire Dog, while January 1945 makes MS a Wood Monkey. I'm an Earth Horse.) I need to look at my Bodie Timeline again.  Any thoughts?

(3)  "The Purging of CI5" I've spoken before about my problem with the briefcase, but if the car bomb could kill King at that distance, how on earth did Cowley, Bodie and Doyle get far enough away from the caravan - in just a few seconds - to have no worse injuries than ringing in their ears?! (One problem with watching the episodes the way I do as a fan-writer is that I keep asking, "Why didn't he kill him [Bodie or Doyle or both] then and there?!" and finding the canon reasons rather weak.)

(4)  "Only a Beautiful Picture...": this is one of my favourite eps, not for any story/plot reasons but because I just love undercover Doyle being all obnoxious and Up The Workers! (very Citizen Smith), Doyle's clothes and the Bodie and Doyle interaction. Where is Felby meant to be, though? They filmed west of London in a swathe across Middlesex, Hertfordshire and Berkshire, but since both elements of Felby come via Old Norse ("Fel" = hill and "by" = settlement/farm) by rights, like Derby, Rugby, Corby, Formby, Whitby, Selby etc etc, it should lie within the Danelaw, not the old Kingdoms of Wessex and Mercia. Somewhere in East Anglia, perhaps? (There's a Risby right by me in Bury St Edmunds, for all the sainted king was martyred by Vikings.)

I've been trying to tidy up my insane number of tags and still be able to find posts if I want to. (Why did I have writing: fan-fiction and fan-fiction: writing? What was the difference?) It's not just me who I want to be able to find my past posts, however - would anyone be in favour of me having a pondering: the professionals tag instead of using both fandom:the professionals and pondering? Or do you not bother with my tags?

As well as fic writing, I keep thinking about writing some planned meta/articles or maybe posting more head-canon or character studies. Any interest? Various people have asked if they could link back to certain posts from their LJs, so I will say here: I am happy for anything I post unlocked to be linked or discussed anywhere on LJ (or Tumblr or Dreamwidth or Any Other forum) and though I would appreciate a heads-up, it is not compulsory. (LJ will notify me if you put my username in an unlocked post, anyway.)

I would only request that you don't abbreviate me to "Nat" (a) because to me NATs are "negative automatic thoughts" in CBT and (b) because Japanese being syllabic rather than alphabetical, the katakana for my username transliterate into romanji as na-tsu-ko. (Maybe it is worth the payment to change the username to dee_natsuko, what do you think? Or dee1978, since I'm no longer in a Japanese-influenced fandom and a Japanese username is a bit... appropriative and inappropriate.)

Comments

( 25 comments — Leave a comment )
hagsrus
Feb. 7th, 2015 10:02 pm (UTC)
Do you think Dorinda's study of C's history holds up?

http://hatstand.slashcity.net/charinfo/calf.html


"Only a Beautiful Picture..." - inspired a favorite story, Black Sheep by HG.
natsuko1978
Feb. 7th, 2015 11:37 pm (UTC)
What's *your* opinion?

Personally, I don't have access to any of the novelisations or annuals, so have to limit the canon I use to the episodes alone.

In my personal (very humble and willing to be corrected) opinion, I think a 1922 birth-date *unlikely* but not impossible. Remember that adulthood/independence was at 21 back then (you needed permission from a parent to drop out of university!). From what I've read in fiction and autobigraphies between the war years you needed to pass an entrance exam and usually also pass Higher Certificate/Matriculation to go to university. Either he passed both of these before joining up (remembering that the Brigades were disbanded in 1938, not 1939 when the war ended) which was not *unthinkable* for a bright boy... or he went back to school and sat them between 1938 and WWII, or he sat the exams when he came back in 1945/6 (various British regiments stayed in Germany to keep the peace and also there were significant delays in getting troops back from all over the world - many British servicemen's War did not end until some time in 1946). All of which seems... a faff that as already a Major (unless he actually went to university on a military scholarship, of course) he didn't really need. You know? (Why stop at Major?)

NB: In the 50s, not in a time of war (which can speed up promotion) my Dad made (Orderly Room) Sergeant in the Army in two years (Private, Lance-Corporal, Corporal, Sergeant), and was told he could take his commission then and there and make Major by the time he was thirty. (His reputed answer was, "Who the hell wants to be a major?!... Sir.")

My uncle (a regular during WWII) hated the officers who got their commission based on social status as they knew sod all about combat. (Though that would not have been true if he had been in the Spanish Civil War, of course.)

It is not *unthinkable* during the War, that Cowley joined as a regular (any age post 16) and took his commission from there, maybe after becoming an NCO (note that Charlie and Barry Martin were NCOs, not junior grade officers).

But *I believe* (correct me if I'm wrong) most officers were recruited/called-up from universities, or those eighteen-year-olds who would otherwise have been going to university. And to make Major he went through three junior commissioned ranks (outside of battlefield promotions, this would usually take at least eight years, post-commission, whether that is as a cadet or a soldier).

If not born until 1922, he would have had to join as a regular for his War to start in 1939; he would not have been called up until after his 18th birthday and maybe not immediately then. (Does any canon tell us when his War started?)

Would he have passed the various physicals *with* that leg? (Injured and recovered is one thing, but in the early eps that limp is quite significant.) It is at least *suggested* that during the war he was Special Ops/Paras/SAS ("Look After Annie" etc).

As I said, he *could* have got that leg, in Spain, while on the Comet Line during WWII. At least some British soldiers and airmen were captured and put in POW camps and concentration camps *in* Spain, in spite of "neutrality".

With a 1922 birthdate, that seems more likely (IMHO) than the Spanish Civil War.

But then again a 1918 birthdate is not *impossible* from episode canon. Winston Churchill became Prime Minister in his 70s, after all!

What do you think about it? What's your head-canon?
hagsrus
Feb. 7th, 2015 11:58 pm (UTC)
I don't know enough about it all to have any valid opinion, I'm afraid.

But "Spain" meaning the civil war has a take-it-for-granted resonance which at that time needed no explanation, like "Ypres" or "Flanders" or "Dresden"or "Hiroshima".

My personal head canon - he sneaked off very young, perhaps about 16, ablaze with ideals. The leg shrapnel was not a problem until later in life when it shifted to a troublesome position. All the rest - oh, look over there, a bunny!

natsuko1978
Feb. 8th, 2015 12:27 am (UTC)
All opinions are valid. IMHO. :D I wouldn't have asked what you think, or stuck those "Any thoughts?" at the end of my ramblings if I wasn't genuinely curious and interested.

That's part of what makes fandom so interesting - all the different takes/head-canons/opinions from the same source material. All the different possible episode tags, missing scenes and missing episodes different writers create, how many different ways people can come up for the First Time, or How Cowley Found Out, or What Happened When They Were Outed etc etc etc. *BG* Bunnies!

Otherwise, you could say I have no right to make posts like this one - I'm hardly an expert on any of it! I'm a thirty-something with no military/police/special services background. I just love history and research and *pondering* this stuff.
hagsrus
Feb. 8th, 2015 01:30 am (UTC)
I would feel obliged to research every single point independently to be assured my opinion was valid as regards the factual background.

I can obsess, time-and-energy-sucking, over incredibly tiny details which may not even appear in the final story so I'm wary where I start to tread!
natsuko1978
Feb. 8th, 2015 02:15 am (UTC)
I have a research folder which includes a list of schools in Derby in the 50s, so on the one hand, I can sympathise. :) I'd refer you also to previous posts where I linked to sites listing motorway service stations and *weather* through the 1980s.

Heh. On the other hand, since I have not exhaustively researched every point (that's why this is pondering, not meta, IMO) by that measure, my opinion is not valid either and this post has no value or validity.

(And BTW if amnesia is a thing you are interested in for a story, I have a BSc (Bloody Silly Cow, as we used to call our teachers) in Psychology and still have my textbooks in Abnormal Psychology, cognition and neuroscience, as well as my guide to DSM IV (diagnostic criteria and treatment, plus details about if and how they changed from the DSM III of 1980) if there are any questions you would like to ask.)

hagsrus
Feb. 8th, 2015 02:23 am (UTC)
But did you research the greyhound stadium? (No, I've never used it yet, but I found a very helpful history librarian!)

The amnesia thing is only a wisp of a scene at the moment and will probably come to nothing, but it sparked my curiosity to see how others have handled it. Hence looking for a list.

Thanks for the offer. If anything ever gels I'll keep it in mind for a consultation..
natsuko1978
Feb. 8th, 2015 02:36 am (UTC)
No, but only because if I ever have them going to the dogs, I'll use the Stow (Walthamstow Stadium) where I've actually been and where my dad used to go two or three times every week (he even hired a suite there for his retirement bash). :D There was a terrace restaurant there overlooking the tracks that did good steak and decent fish and made for a great night out (if you didn't mind sitting in a row).
hagsrus
Feb. 8th, 2015 02:44 am (UTC)
It was D's dad I was thinking of.

Mine was always going to take me to White City but somehow it never came off.
sc_fossil
Feb. 7th, 2015 11:55 pm (UTC)
Well, to be very picky, novelisations and annuals are not canon. Only what we see on screen is truly Pros canon. A writer can make assumptions of course, but what we see is what we get.

As for Cowley, if he got a bullet in Spain, maybe he got it climbing out of a window of some married woman's bedroom, shot by the husby? LOL! Honestly, Doyle doesn't tell us "why" only in Spain. Maybe he went there for some covert op for the government at some point in his career. I could have it wrong if we are actually told it was "in or from a war". Then it's just sloppy writing.

The reason Bodie and Doyle (and Cowley) aren't killed is because it wasn't in the script. *snirk* Being silly of course, but as with most shows, even new ones, there are always plot holes big enough to drive a lorry through, and things that plain don't make sense.

I can't remember what I was watching the other day, but as the main character did something, I thought, Don't do that. It's stupid. Of course, if they didn't do it, the show would be over in the first five minutes! Fanfic writers are better at plot development and story telling than script writers.

Edited at 2015-02-07 11:55 pm (UTC)
natsuko1978
Feb. 8th, 2015 12:08 am (UTC)
Hee! :D

As for Cowley, if he got a bullet in Spain, maybe he got it climbing out of a window of some married woman's bedroom, shot by the husby? LOL! Honestly, Doyle doesn't tell us "why" only in Spain. True, but since the context is that Bodie had just pretty much called Cowley a fascist ("Fascist overtones" to the CI-5 Intro speech) and Cowley bridled ("What do you know about it?!") the suggestion, at any rate, is that he was shot by Franco's Fascists.

(That said, my Dad's Italian friends nicknamed him "Musso" and "Il Duce" just because he has a big bald head like Mussolini, without meaning anything political by it. His Japanese friends went with "Raindrops Are Falling On My Head" which was a big hit the first time he went out there. And many of his English workmates went with "Vic the Moan" as a play on Vic Damone, even though he isn't a moaner, because Damone happened to be a famous Vic. So who can tell how men's minds work?!)

And yeah, I know that the non-canon reason why they didn't get killed is that there wouldn't be a show without them, but I would still *like* it to make sense. That caravan was a bloody big explosion and a very short space of time in which to scarper!
hagsrus
Feb. 8th, 2015 01:32 am (UTC)
Perhaps a god happened along to waft them to safety, Iliad-style.
natsuko1978
Feb. 8th, 2015 02:16 am (UTC)
Deus ex machina indeed! *G*
hagsrus
Feb. 8th, 2015 02:26 am (UTC)
Well, I did a Pros/gods story with The Valentine Situation so who knows!
moonlightmead
Feb. 8th, 2015 04:52 pm (UTC)
Given the context (his scowl at Bodie's comment about fascist overtones), it is unquestionable to me that Cowley was fighting in the Spanish Civil War. He didn't have to be an actual communist. Of course, if he grew up in Glasgow (and we have no evidence for that; Cowley is just Generic Scot, really...) then there was lots of communism and socialism and very left-wing Labour at the time - the government sent the troops in at least once. So he might have been influenced by a childhood friend...

Purging: ah well, the writer was what, 19? :)

Excellent point about Felby - I remember when I signed up on the 'beta readers available' post years ago that I could help with placenames, because yes, if you know placenames, they are very regional. I suppose it could be more of a Felb-ey (ey, island), but that doesn't help greatly, either.

And hah, tags. I get so sidetracked every time I try to do that.

Erm, I have a name more suitable to Arthur and Merlin and Robin Hood, and I just wince and press on. I'm not going to all the trouble of finding another combination on Google and LJ that is appropriate and available.
natsuko1978
Feb. 8th, 2015 11:26 pm (UTC)
Given the context (his scowl at Bodie's comment about fascist overtones), it is unquestionable to me that Cowley was fighting in the Spanish Civil War. He didn't have to be an actual communist. Of course, if he grew up in Glasgow (and we have no evidence for that; Cowley is just Generic Scot, really...) then there was lots of communism and socialism and very left-wing Labour at the time - the government sent the troops in at least once. So he might have been influenced by a childhood friend...

Well, as I said, there were also Labour and Liberal supporters in Spain, my interest was more in the age thing at the moment. (And if he had been fleeing for his life across Spain having come a cropper behind enemy lines, he would still have been fighting fascist Nazis and shot by fascists!) hagsrus said that there is some background info suggesting a 1922 birthdate, which personally, I find just too young. How about you?

I love etymology. :D English is so rich - so many influences - Latin, Teutonic, Norse, Norman French... and then a little later (in the days of Empire) stealing from Arabic and Indian languages. And even Norman French had Viking/Norse linguistic roots as well as Latin/Romance.

And I love how much history is revealed through place and personal names in the UK. Fascinating stuff. :)
kiwisue
Feb. 10th, 2015 09:44 am (UTC)
Right - this is the rushed, bare bones of something that came out of a discussion at Biistocon last year. The reason I got caught up in research is that I was convinced that one thing about Dorinda's account was not feasible. The main problem is that it glosses the whole Spanish Civil War period as the time of the International Brigades, which certainly was not the case. And there are fannish traditions in which Cowley is Gordon Jackson's age, which, again, no.

Fans can write as they please, but if attempting a timeline (and not explicitly handwaving anything, and accepting what most people would have thought about the 'Spain' reference) then the following things have to be dealt with:

1. Cowley's Spanish Civil War (SCW) period
2. Pre-WW2 return, and education or enlistment
3. His Army service and demob rank
4. His post-demobilisation education
5. His probable re-enlistment and East Asian service, possibly Korea
6. His MI5 career and his age at the time of CI5's founding
7. His retirement prospects

These be my thoughts on the first few:
1. A few British individuals were active in Spain from August 1936 and some went back to the UK to recruit others. However unless Cowley was on a bicycling holiday in Spain at the time (not completely outside the realm of fannish possibility) he would more likely have been recruited after September. The Brigades were disbanded in October 1938. So even if Cowley was a too-young recruit, which would be possible even with a technical minimum age of 18 (although the average was more like 29), he would have to have been older than Gordon, who was born at the end of December 1923. I personally do not think that a skinny Scottish lad of 13 or 14 would get anywhere near the place.

Novelisations (non-canonical)- there's something about Cowley being 15 or 16 in the first one; somewhere else there's a statement about him being shot by a Condor legionnaire, but I can't find it - anyway, Condor legion not operative until November '36 and before October '36 the Nationalists had just 2 planes, that were used for sky duels not troop harassment. But even going with this additional information, I can't see him being under 16 in '38. In fact I prefer him to have joined after he turned 16, for later reasons.

2. Unless he was a POW he would have been repatriated in time for Christmas 1938. If he was captive, perhaps March or April 1939. Depending on when he was wounded, he may have needed some months of recovery, longer that we would expect these days with antibiotic cover.
I think the next question was whether he matriculated or not. If he left school at 16 or older, he could have matriculated first, in which case his next step would be University, commencing in the second half of 1938 (at least a start, if accepted). If he didn't - well I'm not sure on the situation in Scotland, but presumably he would have needed an influential friend to put him back on the university track, having followed the path that he did. He really doesn't have the time to launch a military career, and his International Brigade service would be no recommendation in any case.
kiwisue
Feb. 10th, 2015 09:47 am (UTC)
3. I don't have the WWII call-up details down as well as I would like them, but the next 'fact' that grabs me is this:
CHARLIE: University. That's where he met her. He was a major then. He didn't finish his education, you see. Too busy fighting the bloody war. Soon as it was over, he caught up. Went to university and that's when he met this Annie Irvine. She was a slip of a girl, then, but tough, very tough. His Achilles' heel. I used to wonder about them. Then, one day, I run into the two of them at a pub down by the river. Of course, the major had no side to him. I'd just been a corporal, but it was, "Hallo, Charlie", "Have a drink, Charlie". And I watched the pair of them. And I watched him watching her.

So after Cowley was called up, which I generally think was after he'd found a University place (Charlie's "finish" - or that might just be me), Charlie's little speech indicates that he was a major after the end of the war. That means that he was almost certainly promoted during the war, i.e. he wasn't occupying a temporary or acting rank, he held a substantive wartime appointment and there was no awkwardness about Charlie using 'Major' thereafter as a form of address. Since he didn't have time to go to officer school he would have had to have been part of the general draft, earning a field commission. IIRC the youngest permanent major I have found so far in the British service is 25 - although I can't find the reference again. Bugger. Anyway, someone may come up with those details later, but for now I think that career fact would tend to restrict the possibilities further - to a 1920 birth year or earlier. Also, with a 1920 birth year he's too young for the first 1939 call up, which was the 20-22 year olds, but would have been caught in the second, late in the year, if that's of interest.
kiwisue
Feb. 10th, 2015 10:10 am (UTC)
4. We're now in foreign territory, I have notes on this somewhere but cannot find them. Anyway, demobilisation was a slow thing, took months and months, and it was generally first in, last out. So Cowley couldn't have gone to University until 1946, and that if he was lucky and had good connections, which would put graduating off until 1949 at least, longer possibly.
5. Assuming Korean War, June 1950 - July 1953 - except I think Britain's contribution was more constricted, time-wise. I don't know what rank Cowley would have re-enlisted at, but doubt it was Major. Possibly Captain?
6. skipping over
7. From time to time I come across ex-civil servants who are adamant that the retirement age of 60 was compulsory for everyone, no exceptions. I think those people forget the history of the heads of the UK's security agencies, several of whom were over 60 in this period. Sir Maurice Oldfield was born in 1915 and was head of MI6 from 1973 until 1981. I do assume that Cowley was close to retirement age if not over it.
kiwisue
Feb. 10th, 2015 10:14 am (UTC)
Also - apologies for tenses all over the place! I took notes from several documents and crammed them together rather hurriedly.
natsuko1978
Feb. 10th, 2015 10:45 am (UTC)
Thanks for all this! Very detailed stuff! :D

Having had to wait until 21 (born 1918) to get married because his family and my Nan's didn't get on, my Mum's Dad had been married all of two months when he was called up and didn't come home for good until August 1946 (having been in Allied Occupied Germany since the peace, including having to make Germans go to the cinemas to see footage of Belsen).

Also we do tend to forget just how *long* it took to get troops back especially from places like the Far East - the journey alone took *weeks*.
natsuko1978
Feb. 10th, 2015 10:36 am (UTC)
My Dad's Dad, when they tried to enforce the retirement age of 65 on him, pointed out to his then employers that he had been older than that when they took him on! (Not entirely sure what that job was, since he died 13 years before I was born!)

Since it was - and is - possible to go to University *through* the Army/cadets, isn't it possible that Cowley's three or four years getting a degree were (a) on a military scholarship and (b) did not mean he left and rejoined? In the 30s too, you could join the Army as a "boy" at any age after 14, and do GCEs and other exams, including matriculation, through the Army.

It should be noted that in times of conscription various of my uncles (both war and post-War) signed on as regulars - better pay, better training (conscripts from the September 1939 draft were on active serve by December) and better rights, albeit longer/more definite periods of service. (In the 50s a National Serviceman only got £1 a week after deductions, which even then, wasn't much. As a fifteen-year-old school-leaver in 1951, Dad was on 30 bob.)

And with Blackshirts on Britain's streets, Nazi and Italian support of Franco, the takeover of Austria and Czechoslovakia, it was obvious long before September 1939 that the clouds of war were gathering on the Continent.

I can see Cowley joining the Army before call-up, can't you?
kiwisue
Feb. 11th, 2015 10:06 am (UTC)
pointed out to his then employers that he had been older than that when they took him on!

Which is why I don't follow slavishly any pronouncements about what "the rule" was at the time, especially in a time of change. Someone, somewhere was bound to be breaking that rule - the trick is to work out under what circumstances would it be more, rather than less, likely!

Since it was - and is - possible to go to University *through* the Army/cadets, isn't it possible that Cowley's three or four years getting a degree were (a) on a military scholarship and (b) did not mean he left and rejoined? In the 30s too, you could join the Army as a "boy" at any age after 14, and do GCEs and other exams, including matriculation, through the Army.

I mostly agree, but I just want to split that into pre and post WWII. I agree that Cowley's anti-Fascism was very strong already, before he seized whatever opportunity took him to Spain. That's probably stronger motivation than any socialist or unionist background he may have had (less likely). The Battle of Cable Street (London) was fought at the same time as the civil war in Spain was escalating with increased German involvement. I've done just enough reading to find a couple of Clydeside references from that period, no more.

Anyway, even if he was in cadets, going to Spain takes him out of the standard cadet-to-military path. I'm not certain how he would have re-entered (I think it entirely possible that he did, I just don't know how much string-pulling would have been required, given the official attitude to those who went). I do think a short period of mental and physical recovery would have been called for. I therefore tend to think of him enlisting as a private soldier - you're right, if he enlisted before the '39 call-up he would have been a natural for early promotion to NCO ranks just for a start.


Post-war - most of my reading is about the drive to get men home and out of the army. Generally speaking, there were far, far too many men, and women, in uniform. I'm drawing a blank on what happened to people who wanted to stay in the forces, what criteria were used to choose those who could stay.
natsuko1978
Feb. 11th, 2015 10:32 am (UTC)
I agree that Cowley's anti-Fascism was very strong already, before he seized whatever opportunity took him to Spain. That's probably stronger motivation than any socialist or unionist background he may have had (less likely). The Battle of Cable Street (London) was fought at the same time as the civil war in Spain was escalating with increased German involvement. I've done just enough reading to find a couple of Clydeside references from that period, no more.

Alistair Urquhart (born 1919, called up 23rd September 1939, few days after he turned 20, drafted to the Gordon Highlanders - he had to report to the barracks four days after he got the call-up papers - sent to *Singapore* after six weeks basic training, later made a POW of the Japanese and worked on the notorious "Death Railway", and evenually transfered to a POW camp just ouside Nagasaki), in his autobiography The Forgotten Highlander says, of the period before the outbreak of WWII, "Far away dark clouds were gathering. Even in remote Aberdeen there were ominous portents, with local men volunteering to fight against Franco in Spain and violent clashes in the steet when Sir Oswald Mosley's black-shirted fascists came to town." [Remembering John Howard and his black-uniformed "NBP" (as opposed to the actually existing BNP who scrawled racist slogans around my home town in the early 80s - "Pakis go home" etc - and unbelievably got voted onto the Town Council) and Cowley's reaction to him in "Look After Annie"] He doesn't say anything about the rise of Communism as well as the Labour movement, leading me to think anti-fascism was more or less mainstream as far as he was concerned.

I'll have a chat with my parents about demobbing. As well as Mum's Dad, Dad's elder brothers (his eldest brother is older than my maternal grandfather and Dad's Dad drove a horse-drawn artillery "truck" in France in WWI) were in WWII, and he and his younger brothers were conscripted into National Service. And, as I said, two of my uncles joined as regulars, so I'll ask whether they stayed in or could stay in...

Thanks so much for this!

kiwisue
Feb. 10th, 2015 10:42 am (UTC)
Your 4) Yes, I would have thought somewhere in Norfolk or Suffolk would be a good location for a smuggling venture. I do like that episode too.

The same writer wrote 'Not a very Civil, Civil Servant' - Edmund Ward. Some interesting reflections on class in both.
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