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In British English, "moot" - as in "moot point" - does not mean the same as it does in American English.

It means "Subject to debate; uncertain; open for discussion" (taken from the Compact OED definition.)

Can people please, please, please make a note of this in future Sherlock (or other British fandom) based-fic?

Sorry to vent, but it just really gets my goat. :(

ETA - another word choice that's capable of pulling me right out of a fic: other than a few pubs that are actually *called* "The Hole In The Wall", in British English, "a hole in the wall" is not a place where you eat. It's what some people call an ATM / "cash machine".

Comments

( 6 comments — Leave a comment )
loolaa
Oct. 14th, 2011 10:35 am (UTC)
What on earth does it mean in American?
natsuko1978
Oct. 14th, 2011 04:32 pm (UTC)
"Irrelevant" apparently.

Which is just weird IMO.
hamatokameko
Oct. 15th, 2011 09:29 am (UTC)
I had no idea "moot" meant that in British English. Huh. Thanks for the tip!
micaturtle
Oct. 21st, 2011 04:53 pm (UTC)
OMG! THAT IS SO WEIRD!! I wonder how the fuck it came to have two almost OPPOSITE meanings?
impulsereader
Jun. 15th, 2012 05:30 pm (UTC)
These are both completely fascinating points. I'm wondering how an atm became a 'hole in the wall', though - or not, now that I type that and think about it. I suppose that's exactly what people had to do once it became clear these things were around to stay - they cut a hole in a wall and stuck one in.
impulsereader
Jun. 15th, 2012 05:32 pm (UTC)
Oh, and I promise it's just as weird to think of moot meaning 'open to debate' from this side!
( 6 comments — Leave a comment )

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